The Last Roll of Kodachrome – Video.

For those who have not seen yet, “The Last Roll of Kodachrome” from National Geographic. I strongly recommend this documentary.

Enjoy.

Best photographs ever – Part II.

1 – Tiananmen Square [1989] Stuart Franklin

2 – The Power of One [2007] – Oded Balilty

3 – Nagasaki [1945] – U.S. Air Force

4 – Gandhi [1946] – Margaret Bourke-White

5 – U.S. Marines raising the flag on Iwo Jima [1945] – Joe Rosenthal

6 – Olympic Games, Mexico City [1968] – Associated Press

7 – Earthrise – Apollo 8 mission [1968] – By astronaut William Anders

8 – Spanish Civil War [1936] – Robert Capa

9 – Marylin Monroe [1954] – Matthew Zimmermann

10 – The Asanuma assasination [1960] – Yasushi Nagao

Best photographs ever – Part I.

The Last Roll of Kodachrome – Frame by Frame.

Photographs by Steve McCurry.

Two years ago, photographer Steve McCurry heard the whispers. Due to the digital-photography revolution, Kodak was considering discontinuing one of the most legendary film stocks of all time: Kodachrome, a film which was to color slides what the saxophone was to jazz. McCurry spoke with Kodak’s worldwide-marketing wizard Audrey Jonckheer, hoping to persuade Kodak to bequeath him the very last roll that came off the assembly line in Rochester, New York. They readily agreed. And recently, McCurry—most famous for his National Geographic cover of an Afghan girl in a refugee camp, shot on Kodachrome loaded his Nikon F6 with the 36 exposure spool and headed east, intending to concentrate on visual artists like himself, relying on his typical mix of portraiture, photojournalism, and street photography.

Herewith, presented for the first time in their entirety, are the frames from that historic final roll, which accompanied McCurry from the manufacturing plant in Rochester to his home in Manhattan (where he is a member of the prestigious photo agency Magnum), to Bombay, Rajasthan, Bombay, Istanbul, London, and back to New York. (The camera was X-rayed twice at airports along the way.) McCurry’s final stop, on July 12, 2010: Dwayne’s Photo, in Parsons, Kansas—the only lab on Earth that still developed Kodachrome—which halted all such processing in late December.

What did he choose to shoot on the last frame of that last roll? A statue in a Parsons graveyard (in the section reserved for Civil War veterans), bearing flowers of the same yellow-and-red hue as the Kodak package. (See Frame 36.) “I saw a statue of this soldier, looking off in the distance,” says McCurry, age 60, “and he’s kind of looking off into the future or the past. I figure, This is perfect. A cemetery. Kodachrome—this is the end of this sort of film—[suggesting] the transience of life. This is something that’s disappearing forever.”

And what, pray tell, will McCurry miss most about his old trusty chrome? (He happens to have shot, at last count, 800,000 Kodachrome frames over the past four decades.) “I’ve been shooting digital for years,” he insists, “but I don’t think you can make a better photograph under certain conditions than you can with Kodachrome. If you have good light and you’re at a fairly high shutter speed, it’s going to be a brilliant color photograph. It had a great color palette. It wasn’t too garish. Some films are like you’re on a drug or something. Velvia made everything so saturated and wildly over-the-top, too electric. Kodachrome had more poetry in it, a softness, an elegance. With digital photography, you gain many benefits [but] you have to put in post-production. [With Kodachrome,] you take it out of the box and the pictures are already brilliant.”

Never more, alas. Unless, of course, some chemist some day comes up with a way to replicate the complex, expensive developing process. Until then, McCurry is biding his time. “I have a few rolls of Kodachrome in the fridge,” he claims. “I’m just going to leave it there. My fridge would be kind of empty without them. If they ever revive Kodachrome like they did Polaroid, I’ll be poised and ready to go!”

Source.

Victor Hasselblad.

Victor Hasselblad (born March 8, 1906, Gothenburg Sweden – August 5, 1978) was a Swedish inventor and photographer, known for inventing the Hasselblad 6×6 cm medium format camera.

In 1940 Swedish Air Force officers requested Hasselblad to construct a camera that rivalled the one found in a German reconnaissance aircraft shot down over Sweden. Hasselblad founded the Victor Hasselblad AB company in 1941 to produce cameras for the Swedish Air Force.

Hasselblad was famous for always trying out Hasselblad AB’s new camera models by photographing birds. For example Hasselblad 2000 was tried a week at Nidingen, the only place in Sweden where the Black-legged Kittiwake nests.

By 1948, the company introduced the first civilian Hasselblad camera, the 1600F, in New York City. Over time, Hasselblad has become a standard camera for many professional photographers.

On his death, Hasselblad willed, SEK 78 million (USD $8 million) to the Erna and Victor Hasselblad Foundation.

Source.

Here it is a very interesting video about Victor Hasselbad, the F.W. Hasselblad & Co, best cameras ever made by Hasselblad and historical events which the brand was been involved.

Hope You enjoy it.

Pentacon Six.

The Pentacon Six line were cameras made by VEB Pentacon Dresden in the former East German Democratic Republic from the late 1950’s to 1990. A professional camera with many accessories and lenses, the bayonet mount and the design of the camera were copied inside and outside Warsaw pact countries. Lenses for the Pentacon Six were made by Carl Zeiss Jena and were outstanding in both design and performance, however the camera its self can be a different story all together.

Photo by:  i’m Jac

A professional camera with many accessories and lenses, the bayonet mount and the design of the camera were copied inside and outside Warsaw pact countries (The Soviet built Kiev 60 and West German built Exakta 66.)

First of all, you’ve probably noticed the odd design for a 120 SLRcamera, most of them run film top to bottom or vise versa, but on the Pentacon Six line, the film runs from left to right, like a 35mm camera. This new feature results in a more conventional design but leads to one of the systems most annoying issue, Film spacing.

If improperly loaded the Pentacon Six TL will have spacing issues, this is mostly due to the fact that the engineers designed the camera to fit 13 6×6cm exposures on 120 film, making the spacing small to begin with. Secondly the film advance lever is somewhat fragile, the biggest mistake you can do to a Pentacon Six is to let the film advance lever snap back after winding, gently guide it back to its resting position; not doing so will damage the gears inside the camera resulting in an inconvenient trip to a repair shop. Avoid early “Praktisix” models as these are the most unreliable of the entire Pentacon Six line, your best bet is to get your hands on the most recent and most reliable Pentacon Six TL.

Photo by: zgodzinski

The Pentacon Six TL is all in all a awesome chunk of East German engineering, it just feels well built in your hands, with its faux leather covering and brushed steel trim it looks the part too! (and weighs the part as well !)

The Pentacon Six TL is extremely capable of professional grade images and has a shutter range from 1 second all the way up to 1/1000th of a second ( along with B) , has available TTL metered prisms along with X flash synchronization, making this camera tremendously expandable and worthy of “serious photographers.” Of course the Pentacon Six TL is also a great asset to any “Non-serious” photographer as well as Lomographers.

Another great feature of the Pentacon Six TL is that you get Hasselblad quality pictures at a bargain basement price of around 200-300$ for a well maintained model, a great deal considering how any western built 120 SLR made by Bronica or Hasselblad can easily go for 500-1200$ depending on condition, so why pay more when you can get the same quality pictures out of a camera that has tons more charisma and character at a fraction of the price?

Pros:
-Great quality pictures at a great price.
-Intelligent design with many features.
-Hundreds of lenses and prisms available for reasonable prices.
-World class quality lenses from Carl Zeiss Jena.
– Made in the DDR! How cool is that?!

Cons:
– Large, heavy design.
– Can be tricky to load properly.
– Finicky advance mechanism.
– Quality issues on early models.

Source.

Best photographs ever – Part I.

1 – Vulture Stalking a Child – Kevin Carter.

2 – Afghan Girl – Steve McCurry.

3 – Migrant Mother – Dorothea Lange.

4 – V-J Day in Times Square – Alfred Eisenstaedt.

5 – Napalm girl, Vietnam – Nick Ut .

6 – Uganda Famine – Mike Wells.

7 – Albert Einstein –  Arthur Sasse.

8 – Fire on Marlborough Street – Stanley J. Forman.

9 – Nagasaki 1945 – U.S. Air Force.

10 – Che Guevara – Alberto Korda.

Best photographs ever – Part II.

Celebrities with film cameras.

Between the 1950S-1970S.

Arnold Schwarzenegger with an SLR

Audrey Hepburn being photographed by Fred Astaire

Bob Dylan with a Nikon SP Rangefinder

George Harrison with (left to right) A Nikon F, A Kodak Retina IIS and his Rolleiflex

Grace Kelly taking Frank Sinatra’s photo with a Hasselblad

Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis with an SLR

James Dean taking a photograph of Anna Maria Pierangeli with a Rolleiflex

James Dean with a Rolleiflex

Leonard Nimoy and a Nikon F

Liz Taylor and a Rolleiflex

Marilyn Monroe with Nikon Camera by Bert Stern

Michael Jackson with an SLR

Mick Jagger with a Polaroid (Image by Baron Wolman)

Nick Drake with a Hasselblad

Paul McCartney self portrait with a twin reflex camera

Paul McCartney, a cup of tea and a Pentax Spotmatic

Ringo Starr with a Pentax SLR

Robert Plant and Jimmy Page with Nikon F2s

Sammy Davis Jr. puts in face time with his Rolleiflex in the early 50Õs.

Sean Connery with an SLR

Stanley Kubrick with a rangefinder

The Queen with a Leica

The Supremes with their Polaroid Land cameras

Source.