The Last Roll of Kodachrome – Video.

For those who have not seen yet, “The Last Roll of Kodachrome” from National Geographic. I strongly recommend this documentary.

Enjoy.

Best photographs ever – Part II.

1 – Tiananmen Square [1989] Stuart Franklin

2 – The Power of One [2007] - Oded Balilty

3 – Nagasaki [1945] – U.S. Air Force

4 – Gandhi [1946] - Margaret Bourke-White

5 – U.S. Marines raising the flag on Iwo Jima [1945] - Joe Rosenthal

6 – Olympic Games, Mexico City [1968] – Associated Press

7 - Earthrise – Apollo 8 mission [1968] – By astronaut William Anders

8 - Spanish Civil War [1936] – Robert Capa

9 – Marylin Monroe [1954] - Matthew Zimmermann

10 - The Asanuma assasination [1960] - Yasushi Nagao

Best photographs ever – Part I.

Mamiya RZ67.

Introduction

The Mamiya RZ series of cameras to date consists of three models:  the original Mamiya RZ67, introduced in 1982;  the Mamiya RZ67 II, introduced in 1995; and the Mamiya RZ67 IID, which was introduced in 2004. The name “RZ” was derived from the Mamiya RB67, where “RB” stands for revolving back. Originally it was thought that the RZ series would replace the RB series, but this did not happen: as of 2010, the Mamiya RB67 Pro SD and the Mamiya RZ67 IID are still being sold new. The RZ models can use many of the RB components, such as lenses and backs, but with limitations, as the RB series cameras are completely mechanical, while the RZ lenses have Seiko #1 electronic shutters and electronic components are used throughout the camera. Being completely modular, the camera can be configured in many ways. Lenses, viefinders and backs can all be exchanged and full auto exposure is possible with some of the finder options. The RZ models can mostly be found in studio settings as they are quite bulky due to the revolving back construction, but as they are now quite affordable in the used camera market, more of them are in the hands of enthusiasts, who also use them on location. The Mamiya RZ67 IID is still in production in 2010, the latest offering by Mamiya is the RZ33, a RZ67 IID coupled with a 33 Megapixel digital back.

Camera Body

The RZ67 camera body is box-shaped. It is covered with non-slip rubber, to which a dimple pattern is applied. As the system is completely modular, the body needs to be connected to at least a lens and a back to function. One 6V PX28 or 4LR44 battery in the camera body is providing the energy for operation and also for the optional AE finders. There are several viewfinders, which can be attached (see below). While the original body design concept remains almost unchanged to this date, the body has undergone some changes over time. The original RZ67 featured a shutter speed dial with only full speeds from 4 seconds to 1/400th of a second. The RZ67 II and IID feature half speeds as well. The RZ II and IID also feature upgrades to the electronic components, including a safety lock for most types of backs when the dark slide has been removed and a fine-focusing knob on the right side of the focusing gears. The RZ IID features a built-in electronic interface for digital camera backs. Focusing is achieved through a rack and pinion driven bellows, which extends by 46 mm and allows very close focusing with wide angle and normal lenses. The mirror can be locked up by threading a cable release into the cable release socket on the camera lens, then depressing the shutter button on the camera body and afterwards using the cable release on the lens. A double cable release is available to facilitate this operation through the depressing of a single button. It is important to note that the silver connector of the double cable release has to be threaded into the shutter button on the camera, while the black connector has to be threaded into the lenses socket. In the other orientation the camera always fires at 1/400th of a second! The RZ67 bodies feature a built in beeper, which is used to sound warnings. A warning will sound when the battery is low, when the shutter, which is built into the lens needs servicing or when the exposure time in the “B” setting reaches 20 seconds (exposure in the “B” setting will terminate after 30 seconds). Several LEDs at the bottom of the viewfinder are also used to communicate warnings. The darkslide triggers a red LED, while the lack of film in the back causes an orange LED to light up. The Mamiya RZ67 II and IID also support the Metz SCA system through a hotshoe on the camera body, which can connect to the dedicated Metz SCA 395 adapter. This allows the flash ready signal in the viewfinder to be engaged. It should be noted that none of the RZ67 models supports TTL/OTF flash. Film transport on the film backs is achieved through a single stroke of the transport lever. This also brings the mirror down and cocks the lens shutter. A power winder can be used (currently model II) to automate the procedure. On the lower left of the front of the camera body is an electrical interface, which can be connected to remote triggers (an infrared version is manufactured by Mamiya and a radio trigger was made by Polaroid), as well as the shutter releases of the L-grip and the Aerial grip. The connector layout is (from left to right): 6V/BW; Ground; S1 Switch (half press of the shutter button) and S2 Switch (full press of the shutter button).

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Mamiya RZ67 II. Picture by Inkyfingerz.

Mamiya RZ67 backs

The RZ67 is a true multiformat camera. Originally designed for 6×7 cm 120 and 220 roll film, film backs also exist for 6×6 cm and 6×4.5 cm formats. The 6×6 cm back supports 120 and 220 film through a pressure plate, which can be rotated, while the 6×7 cm and 6×4.5 cm backs come in two versions, dedicated to 120 or 220 film respectively. With the Mamiya RZ67 II model II 6×7 cm and 6×4.5 cm backs were introduced, which feature two film counters in order for one of them to be on top of the back regardless of the orientation (portrait or landscape) of the back. The 6×6 cm and the 6×4.5 cm backs are provided with metal view finder masks to compensate for the smaller film format. In addition to the roll film backs, a Polaroid film back for 660 type film exists (in 2010 only Fuji Packfilm FP-100C, FP-100B and FP-3000B is available). The film format of this back is 7×7 cm with 45 degree corners. To obtain 6×7 cm images on the Polaroid film, the last models of this back supported two metal masks (landscape and portrait). Earlier Polaroid backs could be modified to take the masks as well, essentially by drilling two quarter-sized holes into the metal mask to override the safety locks. A Polaroid 545i back was manufactured as of 1995, which could also be used for Fuji and Kodak quickload large format sheet film. This back is probably the only one without a film speed dial and electronic contacts, which communicate the film speed to the camera body. The resulting images are 8 x 8 cm, with 45 degree corners. This back is rumored to have been developed on the request of Annie Leibovitz. Most types of Mamiya RB67 backs can also be used after attaching the Mamiya RZ G-Lock adapter. The film speed of Mamiya RB67 backs is not communicated to the camera though. Digital backs were manufactured by Phase One, Kodak and possibly others for the Mamiya RZ67 II and IID. Mamiya makes digital backs for the Mamiya RZ67 IID. It should be noted that currently no digital back with a 6×7 cm sensor exists, the “crop-factor” of each back has to be taken into consideration when choosing an appropriate lens for a job. For the Mamiya digital backs, special ground glass screens exist, which show the sensor boundaries etched into the glass.

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Mamiya RZ67 with 180mm RB lens, power winder and extra back.
Picture by Rst90274. 

Viewfinders

Several models of finders exist for the Mamiya RZ67. The simplest is the waist level finder. It features a magnifier, which can be engaged. The image is up right, but left and right are switched, which makes this finder hard to use for action photography. The AE prism finder shows the image with the correct orientation. Two models exist, the first one, with control dials on the right side is for the original RZ67 and model II, with control dials on the top of the finder for the subsequent models. Both models allow AE and AE-lock operation with either integral or spot metering. The first model could only be adjusted in full steps, while the version for the RZ67 II (and IID) can be adjusted in half speeds. The switch between integral and spot metering can be automatic or the user can set the system to the preferred mode manually. The use of the “D” screen is not recommended with the AE finders, as the spot metering mode will result in erroneous readings due to the clear center of the screen. A non-metered prism finder with an upright and correctly oriented image also exists. In addition, Mamiya manufactured a “chimney” type AE finder, which magnifies the entire viewfinder image by 3x and is especially useful for tabletop and macro photography. This finder, which like the first version of the AE prism can only be adjusted in full steps, can be used on all RZ67 models and shows the image in the same orientation as the waist level finder. The ground glass, which is attached to the camera body can be exchanged for a number of different models. Most noteworthy are the “A4 checkered” screen, which is useful in general photography and architecture and the specialized screens for the digital backs. All metering viewfinders can be used with linear Pol filters. It is interesting to note that the Tilt/Shift adapter exposure can be measured with the AE finders while tilted or shifted without exposure compensation.

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Mamiya RZ67 AEII prism finder detail.
Picture by sensencw. 

Lenses

The Mamiya RZ lens arsenal ranges from the 37 mm fish eye lens to the 500 mm APO Tele. The flange distance is 105 mm. All lenses feature Seiko #1 electronic shutters with speeds from 8 sec. to 1/400th of a sec., B (up to 30 sec) and T and a manual emergency speed (without battery) of 1/400th of a second. The speed dial for these shutters is built into the camera body, unlike the Mamiya RB lenses, where the speed is set directly on each lens. The manual emergency speed of 1/400th of a second is set by moving the collar around the shutter button to the orange position on the left. Most of the lenses feature a filter diameter of 77 mm, with the exception of the 37 mm lens (no filter), the 75 mm shift and short barrel lenses (105 mm) and the 500 mm lenses (105 mm). Several of the later lens designs feature floating elements (50 mm ULD, 65 mm L-A, 75 mm L and 140 mm M L-A). A complete listing of all Mamiya RZ67 lenses can be found at Christoph Sensen’s Mamiya RZ67 lens table. Two noteworthy lenses are the 75 mm and 180 mm short barrel lenses. These can be used with the Mamiya Tilt/Shift adapter at infinity. As the lenses feature electronic shutters, the longest exposure time that can be used in the “B” setting is 30 seconds. For the last ten seconds, a warning beep will sound and then the shutter will close. For longer exposure times, all lenses feature a mechanical “T” switch. The maximum flash sync speed of each RZ lens is 1/400th of a second, as all lenses feature built-in leaf shutters. All lenses feature a PC socket to connect studio flashes. A 1.4x tele converter can be used with many of the RZ lenses. Mamiya recommends to store the lenses with shutters released when they are not used for a long time. The Mamiya RZ models can also use the Mamiya RB lenses. The flange length of the RZ models is 7 mm shorter than the flange length of the RB. For this reason alone, RZ lenses cannot be used on the RB models, and of course the RB models do not support the electronic link of the RZ lenses to the camera body. Auto exposure on the RZ models cannot be used with RB lenses, as the shutter speed of the RB lenses is set by using a ring on the lens. In addition, the power winder RZ cannot be used with RB lenses, as the camera defaults to an exposure time of 1/400th of a second and the winder will wind on while the exposure is still ongoing.

Extension Tubes

The bellows focusing on the Mamiya 67RZ series already provides excellent close focusing capabilities with wide angle and normal lenses. In addition, Mamiya manufactures two extension tubes (#1 and 2), which extend the bellows by 45 and 82 mm, respectively. The short barrel spacer, which was developed to allow infinity focus with the 75 mm and 180 mm short barrel lenses works otherwise just like an extension tube. It extends the bellows by 27.2 mm. Closeup Tables for Mamiya RZ Film Backs, compiled by Christoph Sensen list the macro capabilities of each lens, which is recommended by Mamiya for close-up work.

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Mamiya RZ67 II with 140 mm L/A Macro, extension tubes and AE chimney finder.
Picture by sensencw. 

Tilt/Shift Adapter

The Tilt/Shift adapter was especially designed for the 75 mm and 180 mm short barrel lenses, but it can also be used with many other lenses for tabletop and macro photography. The Tilt/Shift adapter is delivered with a special electric cable release adapter, which “bends” the electronic cable release connector on the camera by 90 degrees, as the Tilt/Shift adapter otherwise obstructs this connection due to it’s size. The cable release adapter is only necessary, if a digital back is used on a camera other than the Mamiya RZ IID. The double cable release can only be used with the Tilt/Shift adapter without shift for when shifted up. A ground glass back is available for the use with the Tilt/Shift adapter. This back allows the fine-focusing similar to a large-format camera. To use it, the M/R switch on the camera body has to be in the “M” position, the “T” switch on the camera lens has to be engaged and the shutter button has to be depressed. The Tilt/Shift adapter can be used with the AE finders without exposure compensation! In 2010 Mamiya stopped producing the 75 mm short barrel lens, but it can still be found in the used market.

Grips and Tripod Adapters

Mamiya manufactured a L-shaped grip and an U-shaped grip for the Mamiya RZ67 series. Both grips feature an electronic shutter release, which allows the firing of the camera using the left-hand trigger finger. The U-shaped grip was introduced in 1995 and is also called the “aerial grip”. The Tilt/Shift adapter and the Polaroid backs protrude from the camera body. For these Mamiya manufactured two tripod spacers. Especially model 2 is recommended for use with the Mamiya RZ67 series.

Other Accessories (Highlights)

Mamiya manufactures or manufactured a large number of accessories, which are not mentioned above for the RZ67 series. These include:

  • Diopter correction lenses for the various viewfinders, except for the chimney finder (has built in diopter correction)
  • G-2 Bellows lens hood (a simpler version of the G-3 Bellows lens hood)
  • G-3 Bellows lens hood (65-350 mm lens adjustable)
  • Bellows front hood extension for G-3 bellows lens hood
  • 100-200 mm zoom lens mounting ring, prevents G-3 from rotating when zooming
  • Gelatine filter holder for 50-350 mm lenses
  • Adjustable sun shield plate with 77 mm mounting ring
  • Hot shoe PC flash adapter (by Wein)
  • Quick shoe for fast attaching and detaching for tripods
  • External battery case for keeping battery warm in cold weather
  • Electromagnetic cable release
  • Infrared transmitter and receiver
  • Radio transmitter and receiver (by Polaroid)
  • Adjustable flash bracket

Source.

Exakta VX IIa.

 

The “1960″ Exakta Varex IIa

While essentially the same model, this late (1962) Exakta Varex IIa replaced the traditional Exakta logo with something more “modern” at the time. The front plate is also changed, not necessarily for the better.The pentaprism has also a new shape; this is P.3, manufactured from 1960 on.

The lens mounted on this camera is a beauty: the 4.0/25 auto-diaphragm Flektogon, the second-widest lens Zeiss ever made for the Exakta (there was a 20 mm Flektogon, too).

Film is alive and kicking – tips, cameras, beginners advice.

For over a hundred years film was the only option. The greatest names in photography all shot film; I’m sure you’ve heard of Ansel Adams.

Some of the most inspiring, well-known photographs ever produced were shot by famous photographers—so why do all the modern-day pros shoot digital if all the greats shot film? The answer is quite simple: convenience and cost.


If Film Is So Great, Why Do We Shoot Digital?

I would like to preface this tutorial by saying that I make the majority of my income from shooting digital. Film versus digital is a very controversial subject and the point of this tutorial is not to claim that one is better than the other, but rather to provide the reader a better understanding of film, and what it can do for them today, even in a digital world.

The digital format…

  1. Allows you to review your work after every single shot, from the camera, without having to wait for film to be developed.
  2. Is easily transferable in digital format from one computer to the next, or from one mobile phone to another, or from one email box to another.
  3. Costs less in the long run to print because there are no developing costs.
  4. Is more versatile because the digital sensor is able to change ISO on the fly.
  5. Does not expire like film does.

I could go on. The simple fact is that digital simply makes sense for the modern 35mm photographer and certainly for the weekend hobbyist. There are no messy chemicals to deal with, you’re not required to sit in a dark room for hours on end to see if your film [properly] developed, and you only need a memory card or two instead of roll after roll of film.


If Digital Is King, Why Are You Recommending Film?

If you are interested in becoming a photographer, starting out can be very expensive. Granted, if you buy used equipment you can save a lot of money. But even used, a digital SLR (DSLR) can run you a few hundred dollars whereas a mint condition film SLR will cost less than $100.

Even the most expensive, top of the line, professional film SLR’s on the used market go for a couple hundred bucks. On the other hand, top of the line DSLR’s go for thousands, even well used. Start-up cost is one of the toughest hurdles to overcome when getting into photography and this is where film can save you a bundle while getting your feet wet in the world of photography.

The second reason I recommend film to beginners is that it’s a more immersive way to learn about the relationship between aperture, ISO and shutter speed. You also have to be more cognizant of your surroundings and available light when shooting film. I have to admit, I’m a little grumpy knowing that many modern photographers never touched or even wanted to try their hand at film; they’re robbing themselves of a truly wonderful experience that I believe can take them to a whole other level.

The digital format allows one to be very sloppy, especially if you’re shooting in digital RAW format. You’re able to over or underexpose and fix it in post rather than doing it right in the first place. Heck, worrying about white-balance seems to be a thing of the past; a simple eye-dropper tool fixes everything for you in post! Learning on film teaches you to truly care about your surroundings while getting intimately familiar with your camera and all of its little quirks.

If you thought my reasons for shooting film were subjective, my final reasons are even more so; but hear me out. In my opinion, black and white photography has yet to be reproduced in digital format to echo the beautiful black and white film formats that are still available today.

It’s hard to explain; maybe it’s the film grain versus digital grain, maybe it’s the seemingly infinite tones that black and white film can produce or maybe it’s a combination of a lot of different elements aligning to “make it happen”. All I know is that I have yet to see consistent results from digital black and white prints that are as astoundingly gorgeous as examples from countless black and white prints that I have seen throughout my life. Obviously, this is subjective, but there you have it.

Canon EOS 630 – Kodak T-MAX400 B&W Film


Okay Fine, Where Do I Start?

Where else? The camera! There have been so many makes, models and formats of cameras over the years that it would be silly to try and review them all. And I don’t want to “fake it”, I’m not going to scour the internet looking for info on camera systems that I know nothing about. I believe that would only dilute my information and rob you of truly useful, real-world experience. My goal is to provide some of what I know so that you can make an informed decision when you go on the hunt for your own film camera.

In this article, I will not address medium or large format film cameras since I could write a book on that topic alone. Not to mention, I wouldn’t be saving you any money by recommending the medium/large format route anyway. Instead, I’ll start with Canon’s EOS systems, I’ll continue with a short glimpse into rangefinders and finish up with film recommendations.

I apologize ahead of time for those interested in Nikon or other manufacturers. I have far more experience with Canon, but some of these same principles should apply to other systems and the film recommendations should work across the board.

Let’s get started!


Canon EOS Elan

Models Include:

Elan
Elan II(e)
Elan 7(e)(n)(ne)

Up For Review: Elan IIe

The Canon EOS Elan IIe is a steal when you compare the price to performance ratio. While a 1v is a wonderful (and legendary) film SLR, even now a good copy is being sold for several hundred dollars and that might be a bit much to invest on a used film camera when you’re first starting out, especially since the Elan is so cheap and provides many of the same functions.

The Elan is also very easy to find in online auctions. It uses typical 35mm film and has the modern EF lens mount (versus the older, discontinued FD lens mount). I would highly recommend buying one that comes with a battery grip if you want to use AA batteries, the body itself will only take the more expensive 2CR5 batteries.

Why?

  1. Cost. ($20-$50)
  2. Performance and Features
  3. Ergonomics
  4. Pro Features

Where?

  1. eBay
  2. Buy/Sell sections on Camera Forums
  3. Local Camera Shops
  4. Yard Sales

Features

  1. Silent Film Operation (Elan was the first SLR with near-silent operation)
  2. Simultaneous AF/MF with USM lenses
  3. A large thumb wheel for control
  4. High speed flash sync
  5. Basically the first “auto everything” SLR with just about every professional control you could ask for in a film SLR

Notes

  1. No AE Lock
  2. Not weather sealed (although I’ve had mine in the rain plenty of times)
  3. Known for underexposing when in difficult, mixed lighting situations if using lower ISO film (50,100)
  4. Make sure to buy one that comes with the grip so you can use AA batteries

Photo Sample


Canon EOS 600-Series

Models Include:

EOS 650
EOS 620
EOS 630

Up For Review: EOS 630

The reason I’m recommending the 600 series of cameras is that they’re extremely cheap, built like tanks, and can still be found quite easily. This series was among the first to rely on electronic focusing by communication between the on-board microprocessor and auto-focusing motors in EF lenses. The AF system out-performed anything else at the time.

The EOS 630 was the latest from the 600 line. It had the fastest processor which resulted in faster AF, had interchangeable viewing screens, had an illuminated LCD and could use databacks. It was also all metal construction; it has held up amazingly well over the years.

If I had a gripe, the biggest would be that it’s a pain to do manual metering because of the multiple button operations required to accomplish it. The camera is also not the most comfortable to hold in your hands in comparison with other EOS systems.

Why?

  1. Cost. ($5-$50)
  2. Performance and Features
  3. Build Quality
  4. Pro Features

Where?

  1. eBay
  2. Buy/Sell sections on Camera Forums
  3. Local Camera Shops
  4. Yard Sales

Features

  1. Modern AF
  2. Interchangeable viewing screens
  3. Illuminated LCD
  4. Databack Compatible
  5. Metal construction

Notes

  1. Ergonomics not the best
  2. Multiple button presses for some operations

Photo Sample


Canon EOS Rebel Series

Models Include:

Rebel SII
Rebel X/XS
Rebel G
Rebel 2000
Rebel K2
Rebel Ti/T2

Up For Review: Rebel G

The Rebel series is probably the one you know as the “Andre Agassi camera”. The famous tennis player was hired by Canon to market their line of Rebel cameras throughout the 90′s and 2000′s. It was one of the most successful, mass-produced lines that Canon ever made (and continues that course with the digital Rebel today).

I’m recommending this camera because it costs next to nothing; I’ve seriously witnessed people give them away. That doesn’t mean there’s anything wrong with them, on the contrary! They’re quite capable with some pro-level features in a very light and compact package.

The reason they’re so cheap is that there were so many of them made and since they were never a “professional” camera, they were not that expensive, even when new. Don’t expect a lot of pro-features and amazing build quality, however.

If you want to spend next to nothing on a body just to get the experience of shooting and developing film, this is your camera.

Why?

  1. Cost. ($5-$30)
  2. Size and Weight
  3. Easy to find

Where?

  1. eBay
  2. Buy/Sell sections on Camera Forums
  3. Local Camera Shops
  4. Yard Sales

Features

  1. Very compact and lightweight (half the weight of the Elan II and 630)
  2. Accepts all modern EF lenses
  3. Full meter scale in the viewfinder at all times, even in metered-manual mode

Notes

  1. Lacks DOF preview
  2. Viewfinder is cramped
  3. Built-in flash is weak
  4. Plastic lens mount rather than metal
  5. You only have one control to set both shutter speed and aperture, so manual mode metering is more difficult than it should be.

Photo Sample


The Rangefinder

What the heck is a rangefinder? It’s a camera fitted with a rangefinder, duh! For all intents and purposes, a rangefinder is a method of focusing. Most rangefinders show two images of a subject; when you turn a focus wheel, one of the images moves until it is lined up with the other image and that’s how you know it’s in focus. Personally, I really enjoy this method of focusing. Rangefinders are popular because of the following:

  1. Very compact
  2. No moving mirror
  3. Quiet operation
  4. “Both eyes open” shooting

Rangefinders offer a unique shooting experience in that you’re not looking through the lens like you do with an SLR. It’s sort of like shooting through a modern point-n-shoot. Because the viewfinder is off to the side, you can leave both eyes open while looking through the viewfinder to survey your scene as you’re shooting. This makes the rangefinder very popular amongst urban and photojournalist photographers.

If you’ve researched rangefinders at any level, you’ve probably run across mention of Leica, they are the bad boys in the realm of rangefinders, the top of the pack. Unfortunately, that means they’re also insanely expensive.

I’ve had experience with several rangefinders over the years, but I always go back to my Canon QL-17 GIII. I love the photos that come out of this thing, especially black and whites. It is often referred to as the “poor man’s Leica” because the lens quality was able to produce incredible photos for the price.

Canon Canonet QL-17 GIII

You can find them on used camera forums and eBay for $20-$30. The reason you can find them so cheap is that the light seals are often shot, sometimes the aperture blades are frozen and the shutter speed may be off.

If you are lucky enough to find one that only needs the light seals replaced, it’s a relatively easy and cheap fix (we’re talking $12-$15 for the new seals) if you do the repair yourself.

Light Seal Replacement on my Canon Canonet QL-17 GIII

Photo Sample

Canon Canonet QL-17 GII – Kodak B&W T-MAX400


You’ve Convinced Me, So What About Film?

First and foremost, find a reputable local camera lab and give them a call. They’ll tell you what kind of film they’re able to handle as well as what they can print and what sort of print medium they can print on.

Don’t be shy about admitting you’re a film beginner. In fact, I encourage it. Otherwise, they’ll assume you know what you’re doing and you may miss out on some very important lessons while working with your photo lab. After you’ve developed your first couple of rolls, feel free to see if there are other services that are cheaper (including online) if you’re so inclined.

I recommend your local camera shop because I’m a believer in supporting your local industry. And, as I eluded to, you can learn a lot by asking questions and dealing with your lab in person.

Negative and Slide Film

Generally speaking, there are two types of film; slide film and negative film. I’m going to focus on negative film, it’s the easiest (and cheapest) to work with. As you progress, you may want to dabble with slide film as it can technically produce better prints than negatives can and slide longevity is much greater than negatives (which start to deteriorate well within a decade).

Film Speed

Next up is film speed. ISO speeds in digital cameras came from the ISO film rating system and the same principles apply. The larger the ISO number, the less light you’ll need to expose your scene on the film negative.

What I would recommend is starting with an ISO400 film (or thereabouts) so that you have a little more latitude with available light. Any higher and you’ll really start to see a lot of film grain and any lower will require sunlight or lots of interior light, more than a typically lit room in your house will provide.

Storage

You may have heard that some people store batteries in their refrigerator. Well, I have no idea if that does anything for batteries or not, but it certainly does for film. I store all of my film in the fridge. Why? Film is made of chemicals that start to break down as heat is introduced. The warmer it gets, the faster it deteriorates.

If you keep your film cold, the process is slowed, although never completely stopped. It doesn’t matter whether you keep your film in the fridge or the freezer, there are no ill effects to film if you freeze and defrost it. However, I keep mine in the fridge so that I can use it immediately instead of waiting for it to thaw.

Types

Here’s some film that I’ve used over the years. I shoot B&W Kodak T-MAX400 almost exclusively these days, although I do pop in a roll of T-MAX100 once in a while. As for color, I can’t remember the last time I used a color negative film slower than 400. I would probably recommend starting with TMX400 if you’re interested in B&W, I find it to be very versatile. Again, call up your local shop and make sure there will be no problems developing whatever film you decide to use.

Black & White

Slow: Ilford Pan F50
Mid/Fast: Plus-X, FP4,Tri-X, T-MAX400

Color

Slow: Kodak Gold 100, Fuji Super G 100
Mid/Fast: Kodak Professional Portra / Royal Gold 400, Fuji NPH

Important Note

When you buy your first used film camera, make sure to put a roll of cheap color film through it and have your photo lab develop straight to a CD so that you can check for possible issues with the camera. You’ll be able to see if there are light leaks, if the shutter is off or the aperture blades are malfunctioning.

I also recommend getting yourself a light meter or using your digital camera to meter (if you have one, of course). Write down the readings and compare them with the photos you get back to determine if your film camera has a metering problem.


Wrap Up

I know you’ll have many questions when you buy that first film camera and run that first roll through it, and a lot of it will be trial and error. But I hope this article will be enough to get you started and I encourage each of you to at least try shooting a couple rolls of film.

I’ve provided some options that cost next-to-nothing, so even if you don’t enjoy yourself, you’re not out that much cash. I’m betting you’ll have a blast!

Just be careful, it can become very addicting very quickly. Before you know it, you’ll be buying developer chemicals and trying to figure out which room in your house you can get away with turning into a darkroom!

All photos © Shane Parker Photography

Source.

The Last Roll of Kodachrome – Frame by Frame.

Photographs by Steve McCurry.

Two years ago, photographer Steve McCurry heard the whispers. Due to the digital-photography revolution, Kodak was considering discontinuing one of the most legendary film stocks of all time: Kodachrome, a film which was to color slides what the saxophone was to jazz. McCurry spoke with Kodak’s worldwide-marketing wizard Audrey Jonckheer, hoping to persuade Kodak to bequeath him the very last roll that came off the assembly line in Rochester, New York. They readily agreed. And recently, McCurry—most famous for his National Geographic cover of an Afghan girl in a refugee camp, shot on Kodachrome loaded his Nikon F6 with the 36 exposure spool and headed east, intending to concentrate on visual artists like himself, relying on his typical mix of portraiture, photojournalism, and street photography.

Herewith, presented for the first time in their entirety, are the frames from that historic final roll, which accompanied McCurry from the manufacturing plant in Rochester to his home in Manhattan (where he is a member of the prestigious photo agency Magnum), to Bombay, Rajasthan, Bombay, Istanbul, London, and back to New York. (The camera was X-rayed twice at airports along the way.) McCurry’s final stop, on July 12, 2010: Dwayne’s Photo, in Parsons, Kansas—the only lab on Earth that still developed Kodachrome—which halted all such processing in late December.

What did he choose to shoot on the last frame of that last roll? A statue in a Parsons graveyard (in the section reserved for Civil War veterans), bearing flowers of the same yellow-and-red hue as the Kodak package. (See Frame 36.) “I saw a statue of this soldier, looking off in the distance,” says McCurry, age 60, “and he’s kind of looking off into the future or the past. I figure, This is perfect. A cemetery. Kodachrome—this is the end of this sort of film—[suggesting] the transience of life. This is something that’s disappearing forever.”

And what, pray tell, will McCurry miss most about his old trusty chrome? (He happens to have shot, at last count, 800,000 Kodachrome frames over the past four decades.) “I’ve been shooting digital for years,” he insists, “but I don’t think you can make a better photograph under certain conditions than you can with Kodachrome. If you have good light and you’re at a fairly high shutter speed, it’s going to be a brilliant color photograph. It had a great color palette. It wasn’t too garish. Some films are like you’re on a drug or something. Velvia made everything so saturated and wildly over-the-top, too electric. Kodachrome had more poetry in it, a softness, an elegance. With digital photography, you gain many benefits [but] you have to put in post-production. [With Kodachrome,] you take it out of the box and the pictures are already brilliant.”

Never more, alas. Unless, of course, some chemist some day comes up with a way to replicate the complex, expensive developing process. Until then, McCurry is biding his time. “I have a few rolls of Kodachrome in the fridge,” he claims. “I’m just going to leave it there. My fridge would be kind of empty without them. If they ever revive Kodachrome like they did Polaroid, I’ll be poised and ready to go!”

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Victor Hasselblad.

Victor Hasselblad (born March 8, 1906, Gothenburg Sweden – August 5, 1978) was a Swedish inventor and photographer, known for inventing the Hasselblad 6×6 cm medium format camera.

In 1940 Swedish Air Force officers requested Hasselblad to construct a camera that rivalled the one found in a German reconnaissance aircraft shot down over Sweden. Hasselblad founded the Victor Hasselblad AB company in 1941 to produce cameras for the Swedish Air Force.

Hasselblad was famous for always trying out Hasselblad AB’s new camera models by photographing birds. For example Hasselblad 2000 was tried a week at Nidingen, the only place in Sweden where the Black-legged Kittiwake nests.

By 1948, the company introduced the first civilian Hasselblad camera, the 1600F, in New York City. Over time, Hasselblad has become a standard camera for many professional photographers.

On his death, Hasselblad willed, SEK 78 million (USD $8 million) to the Erna and Victor Hasselblad Foundation.

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Here it is a very interesting video about Victor Hasselbad, the F.W. Hasselblad & Co, best cameras ever made by Hasselblad and historical events which the brand was been involved.

Hope You enjoy it.